Chinese Youth Obsessed With Sniffing Cats

According to Chinese media, “cat sniffing,” is a “thing,” involving burying one’s face into kitty’s fur, inhaling deeply, all while stroking the tummy.

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According to Chinese media, “cat sniffing,” is a “thing.” Apparently it involves burying one’s face into kitty’s fur, inhaling deeply, all while stroking the tummy. Admittedly, this is something many of us have done even without knowing it was seemingly “on trend.”

“My wife and I are not ready to have a child, so we give all our love to our cat,” says Zhou Shuaibo,  30, told Zhihu. “My cat has supreme status at home,” he offered, referring to himself as having the role of “shovel feces officer,” a title shared by many fellow feline lovers in the country. Another anonymous cat lover shared, “As a veteran cat sniffer, if I don’t get my fix I feel absolutely terrible. I have a serious cat addiction.”

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But its not just the cat-sniffing that is running rampant in the Asian country. “Cloud cats,” have become an online phenomenon. The posting of cat photographs and videos by owners has exploded with more than double the number of people following cats than dogs. Much of this is attributed to the unmarried population living on their own in major cities.

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“My cat eats salmon and vitamins every day. A bag of cat food imported from Canada is 760 yuan, and the cat litter is made of Tofu,” says Du Fang, who lives in Shanghai, spending one-fifth of his monthly salary on his cat. “I do not care how much I spend. I want my cat to be happy.”

Cat cafe’s, too, are seeing great popularity, as is anything featuring a cat; clothing to cellphone cases to home decor. From “cat sniffing” to wardrobe, it seems that Chinese youth may have, indeed, gone completely “cat crazy.”

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