Good News About Cats Living With FIV for Everyone

Thanks to the work of Dr. Litster, her team, the shelter volunteers, and the cats that participated in the study, going forward rescues, shelters, and animal organizations can continue to grow and pursue adoption efforts on the behalf of all FIV-positive felines.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
pethealthnetwork dot com
Photo: pethealthnetwork.com

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

A report has come out of Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine that has some remarkable information pertaining to FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus).  Dr. Annette Litster headed a long-term study that was conducted in cat shelters and came to the two key following conclusions:

  1. FIV-positive cats can successfully live with FIV-negative cats and the FIV-negative cats will not be infected during normal day-to-day activity
  2. Mother cats who are infected with FIV do not pass on the virus to their kittens

While many have suspected this to be the case for years, the conclusive evidence provided by this study and the relative implications is huge.  For FIV-positive cats, this means they can be adopted into any home without concern for the disease to be transmitted to other felines.  The only consideration that needs to be taken into account are the personalities. If the cats are incompatible resulting in significant, intense fighting that causes deep punctures,  it may not be a good environment as that is the only way the virus can be passed.  Bottom line: FIV-positive and FIV-negative cats can live together.

FIV positive cats have long been the subject of poor information and rumors which has in many cases resulted in euthanization.  There has been confusion between FIV and FeLV (feline leukemia virus) as the later is transmissible through casual contact and cohabitation.  What is in common is both diseases are retroviruses that affect the immune system.  Where they differ is the FIV virus cannot easily transfer through the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, inside of the mouth, intestines, and genitals.

Thanks to the work of Dr. Litster, her team, the shelter volunteers, and the cats that participated in the study, going forward rescues, shelters, and animal organizations can continue to grow and pursue adoption efforts on the behalf of all FIV-positive felines.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *